Category Archives: Edible fruits

Fruits in Season – Winter

Snowflakes are falling, it’s cold out there, we’re trying to stay bundled up inside with a mug of warm hot chocolate. It seems that nothing is growing in this icy tundra, are there any fruits in season?

There’s good news! There are some fruits that are in season in the winter months. Citrus fruits, which are loaded with vitamin C and flavonoids, are grown in warm climates and are ripe for picking in the winter months between October and March. Stock up on oranges, clementines, tangerines, mandarins, kumquats, lemons and grapefruit.

Pomegranate

Pomegranate

Pomegranates are another winter fruit option chalked full of nutrition benefits. The ruby colored fruit hits its peak of ripeness from October through January. Other fruits that will still be available fresh in the winter months include apples, bananas, grapes, cranberries, passion fruit, kiwi and pears.

Remember that you can always enjoy fruit all year-round. Fresh fruit, frozen fruit, canned, dried and 100% juice all count in the quest for healthy fruit consumption.

Avocados as a Weight Loss Aid?

Avocados are known as a fatty food that is usually avoided by those hoping to lose weight. However, the type of fat contained in avocados has been found to be beneficial in enhancing metabolism levels.

An avocado contains about 4 grams of protein, 15 grams of carbohydrates and 31 grams of fat. The fat in avocados is primarily monounsaturated which can help to lower blood cholesterol levels according to the American Heart Association. avocadoThis type of fat is more likely to be used by your body as a slow burning energy source. The fats as well as fiber found in an avocado, has been linked with feeling fuller longer. This decrease in desire to eat might just be a key for some people to lose weight. Click here to read about a study which found that avocados can help curb hunger cravings.

So, are avocados the new magic diet drug? No, however, when used in moderation, avocados may be one part of a diet plan that will help you lose weight.

 

Thanksgiving Dinner: Easy Recipes With the Fresh Fruit Bouquet

A party platter sized fresh fruit bouquet makes a spectacular centerpiece for the Thanksgiving Day Dinner, at least until it’s time to carve the turkey. Before the big meal, allow guests to snack on the fresh fruit platter. It shouldn’t ruin anyone’s appetite.

After dinner, instead of allowing the last skewers to go to waste, consider these easy Thanksgiving Day Dinner recipes with the fresh fruit bouquet remnants:

Fruit Bouquet Parfait Recipe

The remaining pieces of the fruit are ripe for an ice cream parfait.

Ingredients:

  • Pieces of the fruit bouquet
  • Ice cream
  • 1 tablespoon of sugar (optional)
  • Whipped cream

Cut the remaining pieces of fresh fruit bouquet into smaller cubes, discarding any brown pieces. In a parfait glass, spoon in a heaping tablespoon of fruit. Next, top the fruit with a layer of ice cream, alternating layers of fruit and ice cream until the parfait glass is full. Finally add whipped cream on top.

Fresh Fruit Bouquet Smoothie Recipe

The remnants of the fruit bouquet are juicy and healthy in a smoothie.

Ingredients

  • Pieces of the fresh fruit bouquet
  • 1/4 cup of chopped ice (use 1/3 cup of chopped ice for every cup of fruit
  • ½ cup of vanilla ice cream

smoothieToss the remaining cubes of edible fruit into the blender. Add chopped ice and a spoon of vanilla ice cream. Then, press the puree button for 20 seconds. Change the blender’s setting to ‘whip’ for 30 seconds. Pour the edible fruit bouquet contents into several high ball glasses. Place a straw in the center of each glass and place in the freezer until ready to serve – 1- 2-hours. (Don’t allow the smoothie to freeze.)

Frozen Fresh Fruit Bouquet Cup

The same idea is applicable to creating frozen snacks for children. Instead of using a glass, divvy up the contents of the soon to be frozen, fresh fruit bouquet into several plastic cups. Then freeze for four hours and – ENJOY!

Fruit for Thanksgiving?

When you think of Thanksgiving dinner, turkey, mashed potatoes and gravy, dressing, green bean casserole, corn and rolls usually come to mind, but what about fruit? We all know that fruit is an important part of any healthy diet and should be offered at every meal, but for some reason it’s frequently missing from the Thanksgiving table. What can we do about that? How can we add fruit to the Thanksgiving menu?

Turkey

Here are a few ideas to get your creative juices flowing:

Cranberry Relish – combine fresh cranberries, an orange, an apple and a carrot, grind them all together and mix in a little sugar or sweetner to taste.

If you offer a salad bar, be sure to include fruit such as pomegranate seeds, dried cranberries and Mandarin orange slices.

Many families enjoy a fruit salad at summer reunions, why not add one to the Thanksgiving menu? Here are a few links to recipes you might want to try:

For dessert or an appetizer offer a fruit tray with sliced pineapple, banana, apple, Clementines, kiwi, pears and something more exotic like maybe papaya or star fruit.

For dessert consider an angel food cake or cheesecake with a variety of fresh fruits to add as toppings.

When setting the table consider using fruit as the centerpiece. You can order a fresh fruit bouquet or you can simply use beautiful fresh fruits from the market. Martha Stewart recommends fruit as a Thanksgiving centerpiece here.

 

Is a Pumpkin a Vegetable or a Fruit?

With Halloween and pumpkin carving fun upon us, many kids are asking if a pumpkin is a fruit or a vegetable. This question sometimes leaves parents stumped and wondering the same thing themselves. It grows on a vine so does that make it a vegetable? It has seeds, does that make it a fruit?

Botanists, the scientists who study plants, say that pumpkins are in fact not a vegetable but a fruit, interestingly a berry. They belong to the Cucurbitaceae family along with cucumbers, melons, squash and guards. The Cucurbita genus includes gourds, winter and summer squash and all the different varieties of pumpkin.

Pumpkins

Pumpkins are native to North America and are grown commercially for food consumption as well as decoration and carving. They are a good source of nutrition. Pumpkins are low in calories, fat and sodium while being high in fiber and Vitamins A & B. Pumpkin seeds are nutritious as well being high in protein, iron and Vitamin B.